Thursday, June 7, 2018

Preparedness Now - TV Documentary

https://youtu.be/t_IWJx-mOw0 (23:00 minutes)



Published
on Oct 16, 2014
A magnitude 9.0 earthquake has just occurred off the BC coast. A
massive tsunami races towards land at the speed of a commercial
jet. Preparedness Now simulates this hypothetical, but realistic
disaster scenario and looks at what damage can be expected and what
people can do to prepare themselves.




Monday, May 21, 2018

Blueprints that might help make subduction zone areas more resilient.



Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami, 2011

USGS.gov | Science for a changing world

International earthquakes

For information on global earthquakes, visit:

You watched it on TV, YouTube and here:

  1. 2011 Japan - Tohoku M9.0 Earthquake and Tsunami (above)  (YouTube Video – 26:48 minutes). This is a 26 minute long video of the 2011 Japan Earthquake and Tsunami. This was the worst tsunami to hit Japan in the past 1,100 years, and even today they are still recovering.
  2. 2004 Sumatra M9.1 earthquake (YouTube Video – 2:56 minutes) ruptured the greatest fault length of any recorded earthquake, spanning a distance of 1500 km (900 miles). - The portion of the fault that ruptured lies deep in the earth's crust, in places as much as 50 km (31 miles) below the ocean floor. There the two tectonic plates, which had been stuck together, suddenly broke free, the upper plate sliding back upward and to the west by as much as 20 m (65 feet) along the plate boundary.
  3. 1964 - The LIVE Look and Feel of a M9.2 to M9.3 Megaquake and Megatsunami - The Great Alaskan Earthquake 1964 - Magnitude 9.2 - Tsunami Affects The most powerful subduction zone earthquake in U.S. history, the 1964 magnitude (M) 9.2 Alaska earthquake, caused tsunamis, 129 deaths in three states and an estimated $2.38 billion in property losses (in 2017 dollars). Most deaths and damage along the Alaska coast resulted from local tsunamis caused by undersea landslides. The eruption of Mount St. Helen's, in 1980, killed 57 people, damaged more than 185 miles of roads, caused the cancellation of more than 1,000 airline flights and resulted in $1.1 to $2 billion in economic losses.
The USGS has developed a blueprint for advancing science and resilience from subduction zone hazards entitled Reducing Risk Where Tectonic Plates Collide – A Plan to Advance Subduction Zone Science .
..
Release Date: JUNE 21, 2017
Subduction zone events pose significant threats to lives, property, economic vitality, cultural and natural resources and quality of life. The tremendous magnitudes of these events are unique to subduction zones, and they can have cascading consequences that reverberate around the globe.
The planet we live on is constantly shifting beneath our feet. Creeping along at speeds undetectable to you and me, Earth's massive tectonic plates are continually on the move, and nowhere is our home planet more geologically active than where these plates converge. For example, (British Columbia, Canada) and the United States of Alaska, Washington, Oregon, northern California, the commonwealths of Puerto Rico and the Northern Mariana Islands and the territories of American Samoa and Guam are all situated where two tectonic plates collide, putting them at risk from the world’s largest earthquakes, powerful tsunamis, explosive volcanoes and massive landslides on land and offshore. Scientifically speaking, these areas are called “subduction zones.”
From USGS – United States Geological Service:
Do you want to get really frightened: Cascadia's Fault: The Coming Earthquake and Tsunami that Could Devastate North America – via Amazon (as at May 20, 2018)

Be sure to get the most recent edition - Includes a new Afterword by the author on the 2011 Japan Earthquake, the lessons learned, and the parallel threat to North America. A new study just published by the US Geological Survey confirms and underlines many of the issued raised in the first edition of Cascadia's Fault.
by Jerry Thompson (Author), Simon Winchester (Introduction)

Wednesday, May 9, 2018

Emergency Management 3

November, 2016 - Lake Winnipeg in front of The New Iceland Heritage Museum – Experience the rich cultural heritage ...
https://nihm.ca/

OpenWHO [https://openwho.org/] is WHO’s [World Health Organization] new interactive, web-based, knowledge-transfer platform offering online courses to improve the response to health emergencies, OpenWHO enables the Organizations and, indeed, everyone, to transfer life-saving knowledge to large numbers of frontline responders. Would you like training as a Frontline Responder ?

If you have an Internet connection, these courses are FREE, to everyone.

A good place to start is the Incident Management System . You can access the course through the following link: [https://openwho.org/courses/incident-management-system]. You will need to set up an account, but provide minimal information. You will then b requested to login using your OpenWHO credentials on subsequent visits.

From 2003: You will remember the SARS coronavirus – Wikipedia when they closed down Lions Gate Hospital Emergency to anyone with a sniffle, and Toronto became known as the Plague City: SARS in Toronto – Wikipedia ; Plague City: SARS in Toronto (TV Movie 2005) – IMDb

From 2009: You will remember the Swine Flu pandemic – Wikipedia. It was an influenza pandemic, and the second of the two pandemics involving H1N1 influenza virus (the first of them being the 1918 flu pandemic*), albeit in a new version. First described in April 2009, the virus appeared to be a new strain of H1N1 which resulted when a previous triple reassortment of bird, swine and human flu viruses further combined with a Eurasian pig flu virus,[2] leading to the term "swine flu".[3]

The 1918 flu pandemic (January 1918 – December 1920), also known as the Spanish flu, was an unusually deadly influenza pandemic, the first of the two pandemics involving H1N1 influenza virus.[1] It infected 500 million people around the world,[2] including people on remote Pacific islands and in the Arctic, and resulted in the deaths of 50 to 100 million (three to five percent of the world's population),[3] making it one of the deadliest natural disasters in human history.[4][5][6]
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Among many courses, OpenWho [https://openwho.org/courses] is offering:
Influenza sentinel surveillance training

Course information
La version française de ce cours est disponible sur : https://openwho.org/courses/grippe-pandemique-introduction
Overview: Pandemic influenza is an acute viral disease of the respiratory tract. It occurs when an influenza virus that was not previously circulating among people and to which most people have no immunity emerges and transmits among people. This course provides a general introduction to the disease through a short video lecture and quizzes to test your knowledge. It targets personnel preparing to respond to pandemic influenza outbreaks, including medical professionals, public health officials, incident managers and risk communication experts.
Learning objective: By the end of this course, participants should be able to:
  • describe transmission, symptoms and treatment for pandemic influenza;
  • introduce key pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical interventions; and
  • understand influenza pandemic phases and key public health challenges.
Course duration: Approximately 1 hour.
Certificates: No certificate available at this time.
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Tuesday, October 3, 2017

Let Us Build A Response Together

Let Us Build A Response Together

Here I will post the better ideas gleaned from my best authority and your comments, below.

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Reducing Risk Where Tectonic Plates Collide – A Plan to Advance Subduction Zone Science

Introductory Video from Bellingham City Club: Impending Earthquake Reality
https://youtu.be/HBLMgkA3nHM (1:12:32 minutes)
Published on Nov 20, 2015
Dr. Chris Goldfinger of Oregon State University, explains the science and the practical realities of the impending earthquake. He's joined by Rob Johnson, FEMA Disaster Recovery Reservist who will help us understand how our community should respond to such a disaster.

Subduction zone events pose significant threats to lives, property, economic vitality, cultural and natural resources and quality of life. The tremendous magnitudes of these events are unique to subduction zones, and they can have cascading consequences that reverberate around the globe.
The planet we live on is constantly shifting beneath our feet.  Creeping along at speeds undetectable to you and me, Earth's massive tectonic plates are continually on the move, and nowhere is our home planet more geologically active than where these plates converge. - FEMA

Received June 27, 2017 from Southern California Earthquake Center <specinfo@usc.edu>
On Behalf of Joan Gomberg, U.S. Geological Survey
June 21, 2017

USGS publishes a new blueprint that can help make subduction zone areas more resilient

The USGS has just published a new blueprint for advancing science and resilience related to subduction zone hazards, entitled Reducing Risk Where Tectonic Plates Collide – A Plan to Advance Subduction Zone Science. This new Plan describes how the USGS may leverage scientific and technologic developments, address its stakeholder needs, and maximize capabilities through partnerships – with the overall goal of reducing the risks posed by subduction zone events. The Plan is featured on the USGS main webpage, and a quick summary of the Plan is provided in an accompanying Fact Sheet (written for a general audience).

URLs for viewing and downloads:

Fact Sheet,
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__pubs.er.usgs.gov_publication_fs20173024&d=DwIGaQ&c=clK7kQUTWtAVEOVIgvi0NU5BOUHhpN0H8p7CSfnc_gI&r=xXRRpB0FR_i19K82Q3RKbldH199seM5T9mEdX11xccM&m=tRyajiwyfwLI9bXMMQ8uIqHnuvb2T9kJqYtxXi77Oiw&s=utCuGK5Ejgp9VNzv8MbwBLlZ8-KzPfqvPOagL5IqiLQ&e= .

Plan,
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__pubs.er.usgs.gov_publication_cir1428&d=DwIGaQ&c=clK7kQUTWtAVEOVIgvi0NU5BOUHhpN0H8p7CSfnc_gI&r=xXRRpB0FR_i19K82Q3RKbldH199seM5T9mEdX11xccM&m=tRyajiwyfwLI9bXMMQ8uIqHnuvb2T9kJqYtxXi77Oiw&s=JE1-RMaysZVtMOIUx7Jbi7tHZ_2c4UQXRZZy1YTaSg8&e= .

USGS Featured Story,
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.usgs.gov_&d=DwIGaQ&c=clK7kQUTWtAVEOVIgvi0NU5BOUHhpN0H8p7CSfnc_gI&r=xXRRpB0FR_i19K82Q3RKbldH199seM5T9mEdX11xccM&m=tRyajiwyfwLI9bXMMQ8uIqHnuvb2T9kJqYtxXi77Oiw&s=fde2aYAk6KTbP0H2ERqtWPIir3NHQkWGHA9kWP2EA5A&e=  and https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.usgs.gov_news_usgs-2Dpublishes-2Da-2Dnew-2Dblueprint-2Dcan-2Dhelp-2Dmake-2Dsubduction-2Dzone-2Dareas-2Dmore-2Dresilient&d=DwIGaQ&c=clK7kQUTWtAVEOVIgvi0NU5BOUHhpN0H8p7CSfnc_gI&r=xXRRpB0FR_i19K82Q3RKbldH199seM5T9mEdX11xccM&m=tRyajiwyfwLI9bXMMQ8uIqHnuvb2T9kJqYtxXi77Oiw&s=2mE03LPIfi_m0NQFK4NDFLBj4NiwDYR2l0u30A9o25U&e=

Saturday, October 29, 2016

Earthquakes, Tsunamis and Volcanoes: History and Stories of Survival, both Fiction and Non-Fiction

Selected Bibliography, up to September 11, 2016; Hyperlinked to the North Shore of Vancouver's main libraries:
  • Article from The New Yorker - “When the Cascadia fault line ruptures, it could be our worst natural disaster in recorded history” ... READ ITIf, on that occasion, only the southern part of the Cascadia subduction zone gives way ... the magnitude of the resulting quake will be somewhere between 8.0 and 8.6. Thats the BIG ONE. If the entire zone gives way at once, an event that seismologists call a full-margin rupture, the magnitude will be somewhere between 8.7 and 9.2. That’s the VERY BIG ONE. Kenneth Murphy, when he was interviewed for the article, and who had directed FEMA’s (Federal Emergency Management Agency: FEMA.gov www.fema.gov/) - (Disaster mitigation, preparedness, response, recovery, education, and references.) Region X, the division responsible for Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Alaska), says, “Our operating assumption is that everything west of Interstate 5 will be toast.” (The Editor of this note – SGW) adds that, in the CSZ - Cascadia Subduction Zone, the Juan de Fuca Plate continues all the way up to the Nootka Fault, midway up Vancouver Island's West Coast. There is another tectonic plate to the north, the Explorer Plate as well as the south, the Gorda Plate. The problem, you see, is that the land under our feet is NOT really “as firm as the ground we walk on”.
  • It is the North American Plate covering most of North America, Greenland, Bering Sea, Atlantic Ocean, Arctic Ocean. It starts in the east, at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and covers the area westward to the Chersky Range in eastern Siberia. The plate includes both continental and oceanic crust. And, it moving inexorable to the west at between a speed of 15-25 mm (0.59-0.98 inches relative to the African Plate; and Next to the Pacific Plate which it running up against in the west 75,900,000 km2 (29,300,000 sq mi)
  • The Pacific Plate is an oceanic tectonic plate that lies beneath the Pacific Ocean. At 103 million square kilometres (40,000,000 sq mi), it is the largest tectonic plate.
Type Major
Approx. Area 103,300,000 km2 (39,900,000 sq mi)[1]
Movement1 north-west
Speed1 56–102 mm (2.2–4.0 in)/year

North America, Greenland, Bering Sea, Atlantic Ocean, Arctic Ocean
1Relative to the African Plate
Type Major
Approx. Area 75,900,000 km2 (29,300,000 sq mi)[1]
Movement1 west
Speed1 15–25 mm (0.59–0.98 in)/year

CHILDREN'S SECTIONS:

OTHERS (eBooks that also have a printed copy may also be listed, above):
  1. Are You Ready? How to Prepare for An Earthquake By Mooney, Maggie eBook - 2011
  2. Walkabout DVD - 1998
  3. The World Is Moving Around Me A Memoir of the Haiti Earthquake By Laferrière, Dany